• Reilly Scott

Updated: Feb 1


I had a wonderful conversation with a friend of mine last evening online. It was a difficult one in many ways, but it was still excellent. I chose to speak to her because she is someone who my system has historically recognized and flagged as a safe person and those types of relationships have felt more and more challenging to find lately. I’ve felt stifled. Like I haven’t known where it is safe to share my true thoughts and feelings and to step into my full, authentic self expression. I let her know that I have felt more lonely, disconnected and afraid lately than I have in my life and that’s saying a lot. My system is having an extremely difficult time picking up on any cues of safety in my environment and in the world in general. I can’t help but feel like I’m not alone in this experience.


I have been very hard on myself lately. I have been struggling with a lot of anger, confusion and disillusionment. I haven’t been doing things ‘perfectly’ - a standard I unfairly have been placing on myself for years. I haven’t been expressing my opinions. I have been keeping myself small and silent. When I do share my opinions it has been extremely awkward and ungraceful, emotionally charged and unclear. I haven’t been a good communicator. I have been spending too much time on my fucking phone and not enough time in real, authentic conversation with those I love.


My pre-existing safety with this particular friend allowed me to come to a place of honesty and openness with her about what I was thinking and feeling and she was able to do the same. Because of this safety, we were able to share conflicting perspectives on what is currently manifesting in the world around us on a national and global scale. I was honest with her and shared that I was feeling very confused politically, like I wasn’t sure who I was anymore or what ‘group’ I fit in to. It occurred to me that what I was looking for was a sense of belonging - my system was craving the reassurance that I ‘belong’ to _________ group and therefore everything makes sense and I am safe. Like I have some kind of context from which to measure who I am and how I am existing in the world. The problem is, right now, it hasn’t been feeling so simple for me. I can no longer so easily categorize myself as being a part of any one specific social or political group and I can no longer seek out the so-called ‘safety’ of a label or an identification with any specific political ideology. My beliefs do not fit neatly into one neatly wrapped box of any particular political category and that feels deeply disorienting to me. I am having difficulty holding complexity, nuance and shades of grey. My system feels under threat.


The realization of my ‘safety seeking’ suddenly helped me to be able to view myself and others with a deeper level of compassion and understanding. I realized that the human experience is one of desperately wanting and NEEDing to obtain safety and predictability. It is required for us to function at a basic level. When we feel unsafe we begin to compulsively search for certainty, to categorize, to label, to try to control and even to attack what appears to threaten what we feel is true.

Deb Dana, a psychotherapist who helped to develop Steven Porges’ Polyvagal Theory approach to psychotherapy talks about the ‘Three C’s’ that human beings need in order to not become traumatized by their experiences.

They are:


Control
Choice
Context

The circumstances of the last two years have not allowed for us to have these things. We have had no control over what has happened or what is going to happen. We have had no choice over how much of it is managed and how it impacts our lives on a daily basis and we have had no context for why things are happening they way they are. We are disconnected from each other and are viewing the world through our devices, uncertain of what is ‘reality’ and was is fabrication. And this has continued for almost two years now with very little refuge. No wonder we are all freaking out. No wonder we are not at our best. We are all collectively traumatized and exhausted. We are also physically isolated from one another - community being a buffer against overwhelm and burn out and a resource not available to help us to support our systems to cope with the ongoing stress.


When my friend and I were in dialogue this evening we realized something important. As we both shared what we were angry about (and we are both feeling very angry) we realized that beneath that anger was fear. What we were afraid of the most was different for both of us - and in both cases it was justifiably based on our own life experiences, individual traumas and challenges. We were both, desperately seeking a sense of safety in the ways that made the most sense to our individual systems. We were both trying desperately to find some semblance of predictability and certainty and justification for our own feelings of sadness, disbelief, anger and fear. Where we sensed anyone threatening this sense of predictability and safety, we became very deeply angry. And it all makes perfect sense. We all make perfect sense, even when our behaviours don’t always appear to on the surface.


The activist who is fighting to end mandates fears government control and overreach. The one who fights to keep them in place fears their loved ones getting sick and possibly dying. The person with a history of chronic illness and medical trauma fears being forced to choose between making a medical decision that they could later regret or being able to secure employment. The burnt out nurse or emergency physician fears not warning their loved ones of the dangers of the virus and later feeling responsible for their harm. The person who has a loved one who’s family member has passed away fears this happening to someone in their family. All individuals have most likely had experiences in their lives that have led them to be most afraid of these particular things. Maybe they are not fully aware of these experiences. Maybe they are not conscious. Maybe they don’t remember them at all. Maybe these beliefs were passed down to them from older generations. But they are understandably afraid nonetheless.


This conversation with my friend gave context to the degree of anger that I am witnessing in the world (and I include myself in that grouping).


Beneath anger is usually fear. Beneath fear is usually pain. When I was able to view humanity as a species understandably consumed by fear, I could more easily understand all of the anger, the finger pointing, the division, the hatred, the ostracism, the rage and the confusion. Our western illusion of certainty and predictability has been crumbling. And so we attack. We get angry. We label. We blame. We shame. It is our way of coping with what is happening around us.

We are, after all, animals, but we are no longer living in the wild and we forget that our biology predisposes us towards tribalism from a place of survival. We must belong to a pack in order to feel safe. It is a part of our physiology.


A friend of mine in University’s mom told us a story about when she lived on a farm growing up. She and a group of her friends were tie-dying for a school project and decided that it would be funny to immerse one of the farm chickens into a bucket of dye. They put the chicken back into the coop and the next morning my friend’s mom came to see that the rest of the chickens had pecked it to death. Its difference was threatening to them. We are the chickens and right now, the world is the coop and we are all constantly on the lookout for who is ‘other’, different and threatening to our particular way lot viewing life. It is our natural, inherent, physiological propensity. It’s not our fault.


Communication via technology makes us forget that we are, in fact, communicating with human beings and we are losing our capacity to sit in nuance and complexity of dialogue and opinion. Our nervous systems are geared towards black and white/fight or flight and we are so quick to judge and label. Basking in self-righteousness, we spew our perspectives angrily onto others as though they are the correct and ONLY truth. But, perhaps beneath the anger and self-righteousness is an emotion that we don’t want to allow ourselves to feel because it is too deeply uncomfortable and scary for us and this is: helplessness. It is easier for us to project anger, blame and shame outwardly than it is for us to acknowledge where we feel so entirely and completely helpless and out of control over our own experience. Anger is easier. And we all currently feel justified in our individual flavour of rage.


I long to share my thoughts and feelings and to not be pecked to death in the coop. I long to have open, authentic dialogue that honours nuance and complexity and to feel safe doing so. I long to feel seen and heard even if (especially if) my perspective differs from those around me. I believe that the only way to truly induce change and to move forward is to be able to hear differing perspectives and engage in open dialogue. To hear ALL perspectives, even if they stray from the acceptable narrative of the moment. But perhaps in order to do that, it involves us being able to lay down our armour and maybe right now, we aren’t able to do that and that has to be ok. We are all in self protection. There is deep wisdom in that state, as well.


I don’t know where our world is headed, I don’t know how I can be a part of the moving forward. I don’t know how or where I will speak. I don’t know when or if I will openly share my thoughts and feelings, most of which don’t fit neatly into one ‘side’ or the other. Maybe I will share in quieter ways. Maybe I will continue to share my personal experiences and thoughts in individual situations that my system recognizes as safe, just like I did with my friend. Maybe that is enough for now. Maybe, what is need is to step away from technology. Maybe what is needed is a return to community somehow, in any way that I can.

I am grateful for my experiences learning about my own mental health prior to this pandemic. Years ago I would have thought them to be a curse. They were horrible, vicious dark nights of the soul where everything felt painful and uncertain and like they would never end. Now I feel grateful to have learned what I did prior to moving into this pandemic. It gave me tools that had I not had, I would be far worse off right now.


Sometimes we can’t know how the hell that we are currently going through will lead us to a new place, a stronger place, a brighter place, a more aligned place. I am holding on to that possibility right now.

I am holding on to the idea of the dark night of the soul clearing the way for clarity and flow. We often can’t see the way in the darkness. We just have to trust that the light at the end of the tunnel exists. And that’s the hard part, the trusting, because it takes a massive fucking amount of faith. I’m grateful for my previous ‘dark nights of the soul’ because they made it easier for me to navigate this one. And that’s all any of us can do right now, navigate it, as best we can, with the knowledge we have, with the values and beliefs we hold close to our hearts. At our core, we are all deeply, imperfectly flawed human beings who are just trying to feel safe. Holding on to the knowledge that I am not the only one brings me some relief and semblance of belonging, at least.


Reilly Scott is a singer/songwriter, blogger, yoga teacher and facilitator residing in Kenora, Ontario. She is passionate about combining trauma informed practice and body based healing modalities with the arts to support psycho-education, health and wellbeing.

Listen to Reilly’s music on Spotify, Google Play or Bandcamp.

https://open.spotify.com/artist/4A5MnVCAJXz0frpG2qQvD9?si=Wy5PMPGsRdae8nXp4Jh2KA&dl_branch=1

Listen to the podcast: Unraveling - conversations around emotional wellness, trauma and healing.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1788602

Follow Reilly on Facebook and Instagram. facebook.com/reillyscottmusic

https://www.instagram.com/reillyscottmusic/

www.reillyscottmusic.ca






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Updated: Sep 23, 2021

Trigger warning: reference to suicide


I am sitting at home tonight by myself, lying in bed and trying to comprehend all of the various events taking place on a global scale as I write this. It feels like the world is on fire. In many places it literally is. As a trauma survivor, I recognize this type of chronic and constant hyper-vigilance. The not knowing when the next shoe is going to drop or what is coming down the pipeline. It is a type of chaos that my body and mind recognize, but that doesn't make it any easier. We all have a limited amount of stress that our nervous systems can handle before they begin to break down and become severely dysregulated. And it seems like that is what is occurring right now, on a large scale.


I am just beginning a month long stress leave from my place of work. I'm so grateful that I have the privilege to take some time to breathe and process through many of the things that are occurring in the world and in my community and personal life. In the last two months I have been evicted from my home and I have lost two friends to suicide. I am still uncertain about where I am going to live come October and the weight of the loss of two people who I admired and connected with on a deep emotional level is a lot to work through. We are all experiencing grief and loss right now in varying ways. Some more than others. We have all been effected by our global circumstances in ways that we can't always outright see, comprehend or understand. Time will reveal the impact that this has all had on us as we are slowly able to begin to process and come to terms with the many things that we have had to survive and the many ways we survived them.


Our brains and bodies are all so tired from living in chronic, unrelenting fear for 18 months in a way that many of us have never experienced before in our lifetimes. Our thinking brains are offline as a result of chronic nervous system activation. Being constantly chased by an invisible tiger has profound impacts on our ability to connect, think and function.

Even writing this blog post feels difficult as my system is so completely full and overwhelmed and my brain is not working in the ways that I wish it would. To be fair, my brain was already struggling as I have been working to heal from chronic illness and years of unprocessed and suppressed stress and trauma. Current circumstances continue to add layers on to that onion.


I have been feeling so, so lonely lately. And I don't think it's the physical self isolation that I have been in for the past 18 months - though, I'm sure that has something to do with it. Technology has been my main companion for the past 1.5 years and that is not always the best or most supportive tool to manage emotional wellness. I miss friends. I miss meeting people in person. I miss music. But mostly, I think I miss feeling safe to have open, diverse dialogue within community. The division, rage, and harshness of humanity has never been as evident to me as it currently is. We are polarized. It has felt very hard to know where it is safe to speak openly or when it will be dangerous to my emotional and psychological health. I miss being able to more easily access a sense of safety, both internally and externally.


The thing is, I know enough by now about how the brain and the nervous system function to understand why this feels so hard given current global events. In conversation with my therapist last week he pointed out that when humans are afraid they become more abusive. Oh. Of course they do. This recognition helps me to take our current social/political climate less personally. When mammals in the wild are under threat, they become aggressive and attacking. We are mammals - and we have been under chronic threat for the last 18 months. The ways in which we continue to be under threat are multiplying and it hasn't stopped or let up. It truly has felt like a collective dark night of the soul.


It helps me to remember that when our nervous systems are in 'fight' mode, our biological propensity is to attack. When we are in 'flight' mode, the impulse is to run. And when we are in 'freeze' mode, we collapse, shut down and disconnect. When our systems sense threat, they automatically access these states in order to preserve our lives. The executive functioning of our brains go offline, and we split. We view the world in black and white and in order to stay alive, our systems want to make sense of who is 'safe' and who is a 'threat'. I am seeing this now more than ever. And it is an extremely painful thing to witness and to personally experience.

While we are having conversations online and at work and with our friend groups as modern humans, underpinning these conversations are our very intelligent, undiscerning, biological survival mechanisms. We can't help it. It's how we are designed. We are animals that are trapped in a modern world. Technology adds mountains to our already chronically activated, hyper-alert, over stressed nervous systems. We can't turn it off. The tiger is always there. And now it is especially there. It is there in the form of an invisible illness and could strike at any moment, and it is also there in the form of our friends, family and co-workers that our brains label as other, different and dangerous based on their individual political and/or personal views and the decisions that they make or don't make. Shit is wild. And we can't escape it. There is no escape. No wonder we are all spent.


One of my dearest friends and I were having a visit recently and we began to wander into the realm of politics and world events. Without realizing it, we both moved into the defensive. We could both feel the tension in the air and the discomfort of the disconnect between us. I left that interaction feeling more lonely and in more pain than what I had gone there to ease in the first place. Normally, this friend would be a key 'go-to' in a moment of need. It took us both a couple of weeks before we chatted again. Not because we were avoiding each other, but because we have the kind of friendship that is low maintenance and doesn't require regular communication. When we did reconnect we both acknowledged that we had been reflecting on our visit and how we both had had realizations about it. Hers being that she had been traumatized by the last year and a half and was acting from that state of trauma, and mine being that I had been in a protective state of defensiveness and defiance because I was having a hard time finding safety. Acknowledging our own pain to ourselves and to each other opened a door between us and allowed us to see that despite our pain and the ways that we had unconsciously responded to it - underneath that was the same, longstanding, meaningful connection and friendship that we had always had. In this recognition we both felt a weight lift. The moral of the story - love wins. And we said that to each other. 'Love wins'. Period.


I don't know what the answers are. I don't even want to begin to pretend like I do. I am simply surviving one day at a time. Sometimes one moment at a time. I don't know what the future is going to look like. What I do know is that I have realized that my own body can only handle so much stress. I have had to realize that it is not healthy for me to be on the defensive 24 hours a day. It sends my system into a state of chronic activation and inflammation. It suppresses my immune system and makes me more vulnerable and susceptible to all illnesses - mental, physical and spiritual.


What has helped me, has been a recognition that what is happening within the collective right now - the chaos, the division, the rage, the attack, the polarization, the overwhelming lack of safety and connection - is understandably a result of human fear and suffering. When we are afraid, we shut down and we are not able to perceive things dialectically. This understanding helps me to have a little more compassion for myself when I become defensive or attacking or when I view others doing the same.

When I judge, when I 'other', when I place people into camps and groups and label them as being on my 'side' or not - this, I know, is the result of my fearful and hyper-vigilant, splitting brain, which is looking to find some semblance of safety in a world that feels grossly and entirely unsafe. Acknowledging my lack of control feels deeply painful, and I want to do anything I can to cling to a notion of control and predictability because it allows me to feel like I have control over my pain.


I feel like I have a lot to be angry about right now. We all do. There is a lot happening right now to be angry about. I do not want to deny or suppress that anger. I want to acknowledge it. AND, I want to recognize that I have a choice. I can choose to reside in my anger and my defensiveness, or I can choose love. To choose love means to sit with my own pain, acceptance and lack of control about much of what is happening in the world. That does not feel good. It feels better and easier to be angry. But my body can't handle being in an angry state for so long. I can’t afford it. My practice is to sit with the discomfort of the pain that comes from recognizing that the majority of what is happening is out of my control and that it is, in essence, extremely painful.


I am trying to choose love. I am trying to learn how to sit in shades of grey. I am trying to remember that when I feel the need to 'other' that I am sitting in a space of biological protectiveness. That understanding helps me sometimes. And then I falter and pick myself back up and try again. I am only human. There is no shortage of trying. Our current circumstances are not going away over night. And even when they do, there will be other fields and areas of practice. Of that I am sure.


I guess I should try to go to sleep now. My fear is telling me that under no circumstances should I publish this blog post. I am terrified of what the response will be. But, I also deeply long for authentic expression and to put something out into the world that even a few people might resonate with. If you are one of those people (or even if you're not) please feel free to contact me to share your thoughts and feelings. I will try my best to be a safe, non-judgemental space for you to speak. We need those spaces now, more than ever.


Reilly



Reilly Scott is a singer/songwriter, blogger, yoga teacher and facilitator residing in Kenora, Ontario. She is passionate about combining trauma informed practice and body based healing modalities with the arts to support psycho-education, health and wellbeing.

Listen to Reilly’s music on Spotify, Google Play or Bandcamp.

https://open.spotify.com/artist/4A5MnVCAJXz0frpG2qQvD9?si=Wy5PMPGsRdae8nXp4Jh2KA&dl_branch=1

Listen to the podcast: Unraveling - conversations around emotional wellness, trauma and healing.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1788602

Follow Reilly on Facebook and Instagram. facebook.com/reillyscottmusic

https://www.instagram.com/reillyscottmusic/

www.reillyscottmusic.ca







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  • Reilly Scott

Updated: Sep 23, 2021


'There is a voice that doesn't use words. Listen' ~ Rumi

At some point in my life, I began to disconnect from my own inner guidance. I don't know exactly when this happened. My sense is that it was some time very early on in my childhood. So early, in fact that I don't even remember it happening. I don't think that it was a sudden or stark moment that this disconnect occurred. I believe it happened very slowly and subtly, with a large number of repeated, seemingly 'small' experiences that continued to tell me that what I was feeling inside was wrong, inaccurate and simply not ok. These experiences occurred within my family of origin, the culture I was living in, the people around me, systems, institutions and basically anyone and anything in my life that caused me to question my reality, my connection with myself and what my inner voice was telling me. Like a frog dying in a pot of slowly boiling water, it happened so slowly and so subtly that I didn't even know it was occurring. Eventually, I just believed without question that this was the way I was meant to be living. Self betrayal, looking outside of myself and asking others for validation became second nature to me. It also began to slowly kill me.


With time, I came to realize how so much of the chronic pain I was experiencing (physical, emotional and spiritual) came from being deeply disconnected from myself - having no sense of what is going on inside, constantly having to ask others for advice and validation and needing to repeatedly be told 'what to do' and how to live. The degree of stress placed on my body from existing this way began to slowly erode my health and vitality. It created a build up of anger and resentment inside of me that continued to grow, contributing, I'm sure, to the onset of my autoimmune thyroiditis, as well as my chronic depression and anxiety. It manifested as a profound feeling of emptiness and directionless-ness that I attempted to fill through success, achievement, workaholism, food, using substances and relationship addiction. Suppressing and ignoring my own inner voice became a lifestyle that, while perhaps giving me a sense of outer belonging, surface level connection and a false sense of control, erased any relationship and connection that I had with my authentic self. I lost myself. And it was such a subtle process that I didn't even know that I had. Until I did - and then it became starkly apparent to me.


The process of returning home to myself and beginning to speak my truth has felt deeply foreign to me. Most of the time, it feels like stumbling blocks - extremely ungraceful, awkward and agonizing explorations of a foreign and strange new terrain. In order to mend my relationship with myself I have had to begin to explore how the disconnect even happened in the first place and that has come with it's own massive grieving process - truly seeing and understanding how ingrained toxic belief patterns of self neglect and self sacrifice are programmed into each one of us from a young age. It has taken me many years (and counting) to begin to reclaim my voice and to say a firm (literal or metaphoric) 'no' when faced with pressure to ignore or deny my truth. It means having difficult conversations and risking the fear of potentially losing important relationships, or even being viewed as different or 'other than'. This is not an easy road and in many instances I've felt like it would just be much easier to stick my head in the sand and 'back off', go back to the way I was living, in self neglect, self denial, people pleasing and appeasing.


For the most part, I don't think the world makes it easy and/or safe for us to be authentic. We are pack animals. We desperately want to 'fit in' and to have connection, which of course, makes perfect sense. For myself, it has been important for me to understand how much of my self abandonment has come from a place of survival and from a deep, instinctual urge to preserve attachment and connection to others. Out of a desperate effort to have control or to create some semblance of safety in my life, people pleasing or 'fawning' (a trauma response where you adapt to the sense of what you believe others want you to do) became second nature to me. I became very brilliant at becoming what I believed the person in front of me wanted me to be. The fear of rejection, abandonment and loss of connection was so great, that I became a brilliant chamelian, adapting beautifully to every environment that I found myself in. This stategy would be quite successful if it didn't come with the deadly outcome of completely losing myself in the process.


Then there has been the chronic disconnect from my body. So much of how we experience our 'gut instinct' as human beings is through the connection that we have with our bodies but, as a society, we are chronically and pathologically disconnected from them. This disembodiment is trained into us. Don't cry. Don't slow down. Don't feel. Emotions are inconvenient in our society and we are given ample methods to numb, disconnect and ignore our emotional worlds and many reasons to feel ashamed of them. Since emotions exist within the body, it makes sense that we would then choose to disconnect. How can we not, given our fast paced lifestyles and cultural demands that we 'keep up' lest we fall behind, fail to be producers and consumers, and become 'unproductive' members of society.


For me, my internal guidance system is intricately linked to my body and to my felt sense - all of which I disconnected from at an early age out of survival. The light bulb went on very recently and I realized that it is impossible to expect myself to know what I want, need, how I feel or what is right for me if I do not take the time to pause, breathe and connect with myself and my body. In a way, it's as though I have been running around like a chicken with my head cut off - only in this case, my 'head' refers to my second brain, my gut feeling, my enteric nervous system, my felt sense, my body. Beginning to connect with myself in this way has started to make my life so much easier because I finally have an anchor from which to exist from. A baseline. A grounded navigation system. Though, it has taken time and experimentation to begin to trust my body, that it speaks my truth and that it will never give me more than I can handle.


Another massive ‘aha’ moment for me has been waking up to the ways that I had been outsourcing my power, my autonomy and my decision making over to systems. I do not blame myself for this either. Once again, it was how I was programmed to exist. The notion that ‘experts’, systems and institutions know best and are able to make the best decisions for me was societally ingrained in me from an early age. It was to the point that I would completely deny and self-gaslight my own reality, knowledge and inner knowing simply because my experiences weren't recognized and/or fit into the boxes utilized within these systems. Like everything else, this occurred over a long period of time, without my conscious awareness or questioning. I assumed that because what I was experiencing wasn't recognized within conventional frameworks that it must not be real, or that there must be something deeply wrong with me.


Of course, there is value in accessing supports from individuals trained in specific fields. Guidance is important, and utilizing professionals who have information and resources that we don't have on our own can be very supportive. The problem is that we are trained to completely deny our own truth in support of the structure of these systems. We are socialized in our culture to ignore our own intuition in favour of what we are told by people in positions of power, despite what we know and how we feel inside. We are taught that we don't have the answers and that we need to look outside of ourselves to obtain them. We give away our power and our own inner knowing. We trust systems to have our best interest in mind, all the while disconnecting from our intrinsic internal knowing. And when we ‘challenge’ these systems by simply asking questions or communicating their limitations, we are often met with disbelief, denial and rejection.


Beginning to connect to my inner self, my authentic self, has meant learning to truly trust myself again, learning how to set boundaries and use my voice, even despite the deep discomfort of invalidation and potential alienation that come along with it.

As a trauma survivor, a woman and a highly sensitive, intuitive being, being silenced, in one way or another, has been a large part of my life story. I am learning every single day how to speak up for myself, stand my ground and know that I do in fact know what I'm talking about.

To firmly stand in our authentic truth, our intuition, our knowing can feel threatening for existing power structures. Speaking up is not an easy task - especially when socially accepted ways of being are typically not questioned. It means saying 'no, I'm not going to live that way' even when others around you are. This is scary. We need to honour how scary this is.


What I want to say to myself and to anyone else who has felt disconnected, silenced, belittled or shamed into ignoring their inner knowing is this:


I'm sorry that that has been your experience. I'm sorry that your truth was denied. I'm sorry that you were made to feel as though how you felt, what you sensed and what you believed was not sufficient to make decisions for yourself. I'm sorry that you had to disconnect from yourself in order to survive. I’m sorry that you were raised in a culture that taught you how to ignore numb and abandon yourself.

But I'm glad you're here. I'm glad you're still going. I'm glad that you've found the resources within yourself to continue despite what you have been told and the ways you’ve been dismissed. If you can do that, despite it all, you can do anything.

And we really can - we can do anything. But first we have to recognize how we are allowing structures and belief systems to keep us from doing it.

Thanks for reading and for existing.

xo


Reilly


Reilly Scott is a singer/songwriter, blogger, yoga teacher and facilitator residing in Kenora, Ontario. She is passionate about combining trauma informed practice and body based healing modalities with the arts to support psycho-education, health and wellbeing.

Listen to Reilly’s music on Spotify, Google Play or Bandcamp.

https://open.spotify.com/artist/4A5MnVCAJXz0frpG2qQvD9?si=Wy5PMPGsRdae8nXp4Jh2KA&dl_branch=1

Listen to the podcast: Unraveling - conversations around emotional wellness, trauma and healing.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1788602

Follow Reilly on Facebook and Instagram. facebook.com/reillyscottmusic

https://www.instagram.com/reillyscottmusic/

www.reillyscottmusic.ca







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